Category Archives: Networking

The 10 secret keys to unlock your potential and build a network from scratch in no time.

A definition for Networking that has been circulating some time ago in the media was “The unpleasant task of trading favors with strangers.”

In truth, this is exactly how networking feels at first for most people I work with as a career
coach.
Fortunately, they are efficient technics for building a network quickly and keys to make the process more comfortable and sometime, yes enjoyable.

Key 1: start by taking care of yourself by refilling your energy level. When reaching out to others, they intuitively caliber on your mood and energy level. If you shine, they’ll give you more back than if you don’t. Nurture your optimism and treat yourself kindly.

Key2: Fill your life with something that animate you: If you do not find your own life interesting, you could not expect other to be interested in it in return.

Key3: Understand what your values are, the ones preventing you to fully emerge yourself into the networking activities and the ones which could be used as resources.

 Key4: Identify the sabotaging voice whispering in your head and call it for what it is “your inner sabotaging voice” which may well be telling you something different than what the reality is really about.

Key5: Levering on your resource values, craft an empowering positive say annihilating the inner sabotaging voice, make it your mantra.

Key6: Research, follow, reach, watch out, be on top of things to know what is happening in your world.

Key7: find a networking mate or several of them and let people know where you are networking, you increase the chance to meet known
faces where you’ll be.

Top 8: Let go on the result, connect to the present and allow yourself to simply enjoy being there.

Key9: After each networking session, make it a routine to carry on a benevolent debriefing with yourself: what went well? What did you do
that make it go well? What could you have done even better?

Key10: Reach to a coach or a mentor to help you orchestrating the above tips.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven

job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contact

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

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About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

10 tips to refresh your LinkedIn profile during the summer

Before you take any of the steps covered in this article, I recommend you go into the privacy and settings menu of your LinkedIn account and set your “Sharing edit profile” to No.

I suggest you first pay some visits to the LI profiles of professionals in your field to see how their LinkedIn Profiles look.

  • Which ones are more appealing to you?
  • What is making a profile interesting to you?
  • What makes you click on one profile and not another one?
  • What do you find on others’ profile that is missing on yours?

Tip 1
Headline
By default, it is set to your last title, but you can customise it as you want. Pick a headline that is in relation with the role which you now target. Make sure you use wordings used by employers in Switzerland (check job ads title and use similar key words). You have up to 120 characters to express what is your professional identity about. Make the best usage out of them. If you are a freelancer or an entrepreneur, pick words that tell more about you and what you do, than “owner” “Founder” or “freelancer”.

Tip 2
Location
Make sure your location is set to Switzerland, otherwise you can’t expect recruiters and talent acquisition specialists to find you.

Tip 3
Industry
Pick the industry where you most would like to work, next rather than your current one.

Tip 4
Picture
Having a picture makes your profile 14 times more likely to be viewed by others. Use common sense to decide which picture to use. A few hints: good image, resolution, close portrait, recent, smiling, enthusiast, professional but nothing more than your usual dressing code in the type of job you target. If you are in a less “corporate” type of industry, you can allow yourself to a bit of fantasy. Cook dressed as a cook, sport marketer in a sport outfit, etc…

Tip 5
The Summary
2 crucial elements to take into account to write your summary:
Your audience: Who are they? (Head-hunters, sourcers, talent acquisition specialists, hiring managers, clients?) What are they looking for? What are they key criteria to look for a new colleague?
The algorithm: Think SEO, imagine you look for someone like you, which key words are you going to use in your search?
A few hints: Speak with “I”, use bullet points rather than long paragraph, list your know-how even if you have outlined them at other places of your profile, think USPs, think Value proposal, get inspiration from other LI profiles in your industry or functional area, add your contact details (email), if you are, add that you are available upon short notice, add media (e.g. CV in an infographic format)

Tip 6
Your contact and personal info
Provide your phone and email address, these will be only accessible to your connection.
If You would like your email details to be accessible to all, I recommend also adding them into your Summary.
Website URL
If you have your own website or blog or a URL link to your CV, this is the place to add it.
Chose “Other” in the Website URL type option of LI, this gives you the possibility to adjust the text with, as an example: “About me”.
Profile URL
Replace the ugly string of character by a clean URL as close to your first name Last name as possible, check and update your contact info if necessary.

Tip 7
Experience texts
Include all your experiences but focus on the experiences which are most relevant to the role you are now targeting by providing more details for those. Less relevant experiences should be kept short.

Tip 8
Education
Look for the official schools registration on LinkedIn so that you can join the school LI alumni.
For non-academic education: add a courses section (this is sub-section to the LI accomplishments section), you can leave the number section empty.

Tip 9
Languages
Do not forget your mother tongue!
Use Linked Pre-set category. Be consistent with your CV. Do not be shy, other won’t.

Tip 10
Skills and endorsement
An efficient way to update your skills is to take your CV, to highlight all the relevant key words, soft and hard skills and then to enter these words in the skills search window and pick the closest one provided by LinkedIn.
Organise your skills with the ones most relevant to your next career step, first.

Bonus Tip
LinkedIN Career interest feature
Activate the career interest functionality.

With these 11 tips, you have improved your LinkedIn branding, to go further and to use LinkedIn to market yourself, the job4U2 career coaches are competent professionals to help you set up a targeted and efficient LinkedIn activity strategy in relation to the career objective you want to reach.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you want to know more about the 4U2 programs method and content and please share this blog with your friends and networks!

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

Relocation: How to best prepare yourself for your job search abroad

Now it’s decided: with your partner (and family), you are moving to Switzerland!

After the ” oh my god” all excitement phase, you might start telling yourself “…but I do not know anybody over-there, my entire  life, my entire network is here…”

When moving abroad, most expatriates report that having a local network and the comfort that usually comes with it, is badly missing.

As early as possible, It is recommended  to proactively start building a new network where you will be located. It will not only make the whole process easier, it will also make the relocation a more enjoyable experience.
Like 85% of the accompanying partners, you might intend to continue your career abroad; In such case, a local network is obviously a priority.

We have put together 5 tips to help you building a network in the earliest phase of your  relocation to Switzerland.

1- Start from your existing network: Use LinkedIn to ask your existing network for support in your new adventure: : Inform people about your departure to Switzerland, be positive about the relocation, engage them in your adventure and ask them if they have connections based in Switzerland with whom they could connect you.

2. Use LinkedIn to find out people who worked in the same companies you did or studied at the same schools and universities as you  and who are currently based in Switzerland.
Write them a personal message, explaining that you are about to relocate to Switzerland. Be open minded in the way you build your network: everybody might have a personal valuable experience to share about what life is like in Switzerland and they may know people they can introduce to you.

3. Propose to call them when you arrive to go for a coffee (it is common practice in Switzerland) and DO IT!

4. Network with your future local community on forums: Talk to people who will be able to meet you and to help you get started with building a local social life once you will be settled. A great networking place is internations.org. If you are a parent of young kids, join community like bebe.ch, it’s amazing the amount of help/tips you will receive from other parents on such forums.

5. Take time off: leave the moving boxes unpacked for a few hours, and join networking events, go and meet people you have contacted before you moved, visit your new city, treat yourself to a few hours of being a tourist in your new region.

Of course, if you are already in Switzerland, it’s not to late to build a network , the tips still apply.

Job4u2 is giving networking a predominant place in the 4U2 programs. We support the partners in establishing a local professional network in relation with their professional goals.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you want to know more about the 4U2 programs method and content and please share this blog with your NETWORK!

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

A 6 steps auto-coaching guide for New Year’s resolutions that won’t be forgotten

Tired of all these disappointing times when New Year’s resolutions have lasted a couple of weeks before we dropped them or forgot them, most of us have given up even trying to set them. “New Year’s resolution? Never mind!”

Yet, don’t you secretly dream that this new year could be a little different, a little better, maybe it could be the year of a real personal development, or even the year of a positive change in your life?
This year, not a list of objectives which are impossible to achieve but rather a bit of time for yourself to identify an objective that is really important to you while starting 2018.

In the first place: A profound yet dynamic self-awareness.

Profound because for your resolution to bring you something strong, durable and fully satisfying, it should be related to your deep-Self and not to your ego or to a passing wish. One tends to imagine the Self as something static but yet it is extremely liberating to think about who we are as being in movement, with a dynamic reality. Remember the person you were in early 2017, the thoughts that cluttered your mind, your internal state, your physical shape, your mood. Is it exactly the same now?
Thus it is to your Self of this beginning of 2018 that these resolutions should be addressed.

Step 1: A few questions to re-acquaint yourself with your present Self.

  • In what stage of your life are you? I suggest a very simplified model: period of construction, period of maturation or period of harvest.
  • What are the ones of your roles which today are important to you? Parent, professional, friend, child, spouse, other?
  • What is your body telling you?  Exhaustion, energy, need for movement, need for well-being, tension, relaxation, etc.?
  • What have you been proud of or satisfied with in 2017?
  • Which compliment has especially touched you? What does that tell you about yourself?

Give time to these reflections to make their way and to anchor before you move on to step 2.
Let them accompany you in a moment of calm, of relaxation where you can be alone with your own thoughts.

Step 2: Your current aspirations.

  • What more do you pursue today?
  • What less do you pursue today?
  • What difference are you seeking for today?
  • What do you expect from fulfilling these aspirations that is really important to you? What is there essential to you?

Of all these things that have come to your mind, which one induces emotion, which one resonates most in you, or which one provokes pleasant dreams?

Step 3: At this point, you start sensing which directions are tempting to take and which are most important to you.

  • What do you need to happen in your life to feel satisfied, at the end of 2018, with your progress filling the gap between current situation and targeted situation?
  • Note this as Your Goal.

How will you feel when you will have achieved this goal, what will you tell to yourself? What will you then think of yourself? What will make others realise that you have reached your goal?

Step 4: The very first little step.

  • What could be the smallest possible step you could make toward this goal? This must be something you can proceed with in the next couple of weeks.
  • What could still prevent you from performing this in the coming 2 weeks?
  • Modify your first smallest step possible until nothing can stop you from actually doing it within two weeks.

Step 5: Surround yourself with people with the type of energy that might fail you to be able to keep moving forward beyond the first small step.

Identify and write down at least 1 resource person and share your resolution with him/her. Ask him/her formally for his/her support.

Step 6: Plan how you will celebrate the successful achievement of your 2018 resolution.

Make an appointment in your agenda with yourself or with those you want to be part of the celebration of this success.

I wish you a lot of success in achieving your 2018 resolution and a wonderful year 2018!! Sandrine van den Oudenhoven

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes. Read more article from Sandrine on the blog