Category Archives: Dual career

Why Job Searching with a positive mindset is more effective than without?

Have you noticed that when you reply “I am looking for a job!” when asked “what are you doing?”, your interlocutor often seems embarrassed, sometime even sorry for you?

To most people job searching calls into negative thoughts, uncomfortable feelings and into something to be avoided if you can.

Is displeasure and sorrow what you anticipate as you enter in your job search journey?
Is it what your relatives fear you will meet in your quest?

At this stage, I would like to advance a hypothesis and see if you could agree with it:

If one person can enjoy a job search, another one can too.
Right?

Life has blessed me with 4 job searches so far. 3 of them, I enjoyed a lot.
One was about a career change: it was all about exploring a field I was extremely curious about. Each application was feeding my hunger for new perspectives and my thirst for knowledge for the sector I was willing to enter. No need to say that with such a motivation, my job search has been pretty short, and I was hired very quickly.

Another one was occurring because I had relocated abroad. I visited the Netherlands and Belgium at the pace of the invitations to interviews I received. Each interview was a reason for a touristic discovery tour in a new city, I was looking forward to each appointment. The right job crossed my way before I was done with the exploration: there are still parts of the Netherlands that I don’t know!

The third job search was a personal discovery trip: I was not really sure what I was going to do next. I did a lot of research’s, most of them taking me away from employment type of roles. It ended up in one interview which was the revelation: I discovered I wanted to create my own company while I was being interviewed! 3 months after it was live.

The only time I did not enjoy a job search was the first one I conducted, right after graduation. I was expecting it to be unpleasant, it has been. Looking back now, I am not surprised, my mind-set anticipated the annoyance and shaped it.

The lesson I’ve learned with these personal experiences has since been reinforced by what I witness, as a career coach, with my coachees. The moment job search become enjoyable, success is always just around the corner.
An enjoyable job search can mean different things depending on who you are: it can be a source of knowledge, a way to discover a new country, to get accounted to a new culture, to discover a new industry, to ease off on the pedal, to practice a language, to get out of the house, to be challenged, to score a success, to meet new people, to touch your own limits, etc.

The very first things you can do to enter into your own form of job search enjoyment is to adjust your belief from “job search is a pain“ to your own version of what a job search could alternatively be.
Go for a double objective:
– Objective 1: find a job.
– Objective 2: [ articulate here your own enjoyment objective for during your job search ]

Then switch objective 1 with objective 2. Doesn’t it already feel better?

Why Job searching with a positive mindset is so important?

Have you ever noticed what happens when you start a day smiling? When you know that you will be successful? When you are truly enjoying what you do?

Job search does not work any differently.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

15 trendy jobs for the future- 3 criteria to find yours

The jobs selected for this series of blogs are all occupations which demand will increase in the coming years.
4 categories will see the most important upwards trends:

Healthcare and Personal Care / IT & Digitalisation / Environment Care / Education and Professional supports / Factory 4.0.

For each presented trendy job, we provide 3 criteria to help you assess if that is something for you:

  • Entrance efforts: How much learning efforts one would need to deploy to step in that new occupation field: low, mid, high.
  • Growth trend: Some sectors will grow faster and more intensively than others: low, mid, high.
  • Local Language requirements: Some occupations will have some global or regional reach and some others will be more local, implying different languages requirements: low, high.

In today’s blog, the focus is given to 3 jobs in the category Healthcare and Personal Care.
When available, we provide some further information about the way, in Switzerland, to  educate yourself for these professions.

Home Health Aides

A home health aide cares for people who have disabilities, chronic illnesses, cognitive impairments, or age-related problems, who have the need or desire to still live in their own home. The home health aide provides basic services such as giving medicine, changing bandages, and checking vital signs like temperature, and pulse and respiration rates. They also provide domestic support such as changing bed linens, washing and ironing the patient’s laundry, and cleaning the patient’s place of living. They also support patients in their mobility and entertain them to keep them mentally healthy and alert

Entrance effort: low
Growth trend: high
Local Language requirement: high

Swiss education: Delivered by the Swiss red-cross, informations available in French and in German

Nurses

Nurses monitor patients, administers medications, keeps records, consults with healthcare providers, educates patients and more. They collaborate with physicians and multidisciplinary team members; provide physical and psychological support to patients, friends, and families; supervise assigned team members.

Entrance effort: mid
Growth trend: mid
Local Language requirement: high

Swiss education: B.A (3 years education in a HES/ Fachhochschule)

Medical and health services managers 

(also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators)
They may manage an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians.Responsibilities range from managing employees to budgeting to purchasing equipment.

Entrance effort: high
Growth trend: low
Local Language requirement: high

Swiss education: Amongst others, HEC Lausanne and Universität Bern offer the Master of Health Administration. prerequisite Bachelor in business administration, health administration, hospital administration, management, or human resources management

In upcoming blogs you will discover jobs related to IT & Digitalisation, Environment Care, Education and Professional supports  and to Factory 4.0.

To insure you do not miss the upcoming articles, follow us on the job4U2 LinkedIn page or on Facebook.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

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About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

Soft landing to Switzerland

When relocating to a new country, one often comes with hopes and expectations for a new life, some aspirations to discover a new culture, to connect with new people and to embrace the local way of living.

The bubble of expectations could be getting some heckling when the new comer goes through the change rollercoaster. When not taking care, it could lead to a bitter feeling, to frustrations and even to a certain angriness and rejection of what the new country has to offer.

The Swiss media is full of articles about expats complaining about the locals not being friendly and about the encountered difficulties to connect with Swiss people.
Each country has its own culture and its inhabitants their specificities. Some are more permeable than others. Margaret Oertig-Davidson, in her book – Beyond Chocolate: Understanding Swiss Culture – uses a pertinent metaphor: The peach and the coconut cultures. She explains that the Swiss are like coconuts, it’s hard to get in but once you passed the hard shell, you reach a level on inclusion few people do offer.

In the first months following the arrival in Switzerland, during the acclimation time, new comers will have to manage simultaneously their own change emotional roller coaster and the coconut shell barrier.

Here are the 2 keys for a soft landing that I would like to share with new comers to Switzerland:

1- Independently about how happy you are to move here, you first need to take care of your personal resources because a change is and remains a stressful time. The earliest you will realize that you need to pay an extra attention to yourself, the most you will make out of your Swiss experience. A coach can be a good resource to help you understand your personal psychological needs during the relocation transition.

2- Be pragmatic, take things step by step and pace down the expectations you set on yourself and on the new country. Take advantage of the available new comers’ communities such as Internations.org, Glocals, Meetup groups to fulfil your social needs. Time will come latter to integrate deeper into the Swiss culture: when you will be more at ease with the local language and once you will have entered a more comfortable stage of your change roller coaster.

We tend to want it all quickly, but embracing a new culture is also embracing its tempo and aligning our own internal rhythm to the country one.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.