5 tips to find part-time jobs in Switzerland

In Switzerland, 58,8% active women (63% of the female population) are working part-time. So do 17,1% of active men who are 74.14% of the male population.

With a fast calculation, you will have found that there are more than 2 millions persons working part time in Switzerland, 36.4% of the Swiss working force.

However in October 2018, less than 4% of the job posted on indeed.ch are offered as part-time jobs..

On LinkedIn, where traditionally higher-level jobs are posted, the ration falls to 0.3% of part-time jobs posted the last month in Switzerland (only 408 jobs on the entire Swiss territory, most of them entry level or internships.)

Where to find these 2 million Swiss part-time jobs??

One thing I should underline is that part-time employees turnover is much lower as full-time employees ‘one. This is an information to share widely with employers because retention is a key benefit for a company who is offering part-time positions.

As you can understand, these 2 million jobs do not easily get vacant however there are 5 tips I would like to share to help you capture them when they get available:

1- Focus on specialised job-board. They are not numerous but TeilZeitKarriere is one of them.

2- Target companies which have already adopted a part-time job offer approach.

If you speak the local language, you increase your chances: Indeed the top 100 companies offering part-time are not the most likely ones to offer an English working environment

3- Start with an 100% occupation rate, show that you are organised, efficient and that you create value for the organisation and negotiate a part-time job as a second step.

This approach can only work if you have the possibility to get organised around a full time job for at least 12 months.

4- Target SMEs. They are much more likely to be happy to control their cost and to benefit from talented professionals on a part-time jobs. They do not often advertise on line because they do not have the capacity to sort out hundreds of CVs.

Take also into account that SMEs do not frequently mandate recruiting firms for part-time positions as the cost for the search would be the same as for a full-time and because they do not have the same budget as big companies. The primary way for SMEs to hire new staff is via their network.

5-Set your own business, offer your services as an independent professional.

In 2018, 40% of Swiss companies reported that they were looking for external consultants when they had trouble to find the right profiles on the job market.

How can job4U2 help you?

First, we can give you a fair feed-back on the chance you will have to find an employed part-time job based on the industry you are in, your professional profile and your targeted region of search.

Then, we help you set your branding right and develop a comprehensible application strategy. Alternatively, we help you find an alternative path and provide you with support for the deployment.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

The unspoken challenges Dual Career partners are facing on the job market.

When we imagine ourselves relocating our career into a foreign country, the very first challenge that comes to our mind is the language.

Of course, speaking the local language(s) is greatly facilitating the job search however, there are other major pitfalls that Dual Career partners learn to overcome on the way:

Dual Career partners are more affected by the negativism of people crossing their way as they would have been back home because:

  • When in your country, in a familiar setting and a culture you know, a recruiter tells you “it’s not going to be possible”, you think “Well, he could be wrong, it’s only his own opinion, I will seek for more feed-back”. But when you do not know a thing about the local job market and that you do not have tons of opportunities to get alternative sources of information, you might let this one-person opinion destroy your confidence.

Dual Career partners do not have a supportive friend circles to cheer up their mood and encourage them in their efforts because

  • Friends left abroad are not aware about the relocation challenges and might demonstrate little empathy for the issues Dual Career partners encounter in their new location and might be sometime resentful for their departure. They might even think or say “if that’s so difficult, you should have stayed here with us” which obviously is not really helping,
  • It takes time to build a new circle of friends and most people who have not developed new friendships outside the working place for many years are a bit overwhelmed with the process.

Dual Career partners tend to misinterpret a rejection to a job application as a result of a gap in their profile and tend to quickly feel discouraged:

  • Because often, they are not sufficiently aware of the local job market reality and have a biased vision,
  • They can only rely on statistics and official numbers although a low employment rate might not always be synonym of an accessible market for outsiders.

Other challenges Dual Career partners are facing include missing the working life structure and its socializing opportunities, being overwhelmed by relocation domestic activities not providing much in terms of intellectual challenges, feeling disconnected from the working partner who is busy with getting up to speed with a new job, etc. The challenges are numerous.

Overcoming these obstacles is an incredibly powerful source of person development which greatly contribute to make the relocation worth it, however it sometime requires time and an outside help to get the best out of it.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

10 tips to refresh your LinkedIn profile during the summer

Before you take any of the steps covered in this article, I recommend you go into the privacy and settings menu of your LinkedIn account and set your “Sharing edit profile” to No.

I suggest you first pay some visits to the LI profiles of professionals in your field to see how their LinkedIn Profiles look.

  • Which ones are more appealing to you?
  • What is making a profile interesting to you?
  • What makes you click on one profile and not another one?
  • What do you find on others’ profile that is missing on yours?

Tip 1
Headline
By default, it is set to your last title, but you can customise it as you want. Pick a headline that is in relation with the role which you now target. Make sure you use wordings used by employers in Switzerland (check job ads title and use similar key words). You have up to 120 characters to express what is your professional identity about. Make the best usage out of them. If you are a freelancer or an entrepreneur, pick words that tell more about you and what you do, than “owner” “Founder” or “freelancer”.

Tip 2
Location
Make sure your location is set to Switzerland, otherwise you can’t expect recruiters and talent acquisition specialists to find you.

Tip 3
Industry
Pick the industry where you most would like to work, next rather than your current one.

Tip 4
Picture
Having a picture makes your profile 14 times more likely to be viewed by others. Use common sense to decide which picture to use. A few hints: good image, resolution, close portrait, recent, smiling, enthusiast, professional but nothing more than your usual dressing code in the type of job you target. If you are in a less “corporate” type of industry, you can allow yourself to a bit of fantasy. Cook dressed as a cook, sport marketer in a sport outfit, etc…

Tip 5
The Summary
2 crucial elements to take into account to write your summary:
Your audience: Who are they? (Head-hunters, sourcers, talent acquisition specialists, hiring managers, clients?) What are they looking for? What are they key criteria to look for a new colleague?
The algorithm: Think SEO, imagine you look for someone like you, which key words are you going to use in your search?
A few hints: Speak with “I”, use bullet points rather than long paragraph, list your know-how even if you have outlined them at other places of your profile, think USPs, think Value proposal, get inspiration from other LI profiles in your industry or functional area, add your contact details (email), if you are, add that you are available upon short notice, add media (e.g. CV in an infographic format)

Tip 6
Your contact and personal info
Provide your phone and email address, these will be only accessible to your connection.
If You would like your email details to be accessible to all, I recommend also adding them into your Summary.
Website URL
If you have your own website or blog or a URL link to your CV, this is the place to add it.
Chose “Other” in the Website URL type option of LI, this gives you the possibility to adjust the text with, as an example: “About me”.
Profile URL
Replace the ugly string of character by a clean URL as close to your first name Last name as possible, check and update your contact info if necessary.

Tip 7
Experience texts
Include all your experiences but focus on the experiences which are most relevant to the role you are now targeting by providing more details for those. Less relevant experiences should be kept short.

Tip 8
Education
Look for the official schools registration on LinkedIn so that you can join the school LI alumni.
For non-academic education: add a courses section (this is sub-section to the LI accomplishments section), you can leave the number section empty.

Tip 9
Languages
Do not forget your mother tongue!
Use Linked Pre-set category. Be consistent with your CV. Do not be shy, other won’t.

Tip 10
Skills and endorsement
An efficient way to update your skills is to take your CV, to highlight all the relevant key words, soft and hard skills and then to enter these words in the skills search window and pick the closest one provided by LinkedIn.
Organise your skills with the ones most relevant to your next career step, first.

Bonus Tip
LinkedIN Career interest feature
Activate the career interest functionality.

With these 11 tips, you have improved your LinkedIn branding, to go further and to use LinkedIn to market yourself, the job4U2 career coaches are competent professionals to help you set up a targeted and efficient LinkedIn activity strategy in relation to the career objective you want to reach.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you want to know more about the 4U2 programs method and content and please share this blog with your friends and networks!

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

Relocation: How to best prepare yourself for your job search abroad

Now it’s decided: with your partner (and family), you are moving to Switzerland!

After the ” oh my god” all excitement phase, you might start telling yourself “…but I do not know anybody over-there, my entire  life, my entire network is here…”

When moving abroad, most expatriates report that having a local network and the comfort that usually comes with it, is badly missing.

As early as possible, It is recommended  to proactively start building a new network where you will be located. It will not only make the whole process easier, it will also make the relocation a more enjoyable experience.
Like 85% of the accompanying partners, you might intend to continue your career abroad; In such case, a local network is obviously a priority.

We have put together 5 tips to help you building a network in the earliest phase of your  relocation to Switzerland.

1- Start from your existing network: Use LinkedIn to ask your existing network for support in your new adventure: : Inform people about your departure to Switzerland, be positive about the relocation, engage them in your adventure and ask them if they have connections based in Switzerland with whom they could connect you.

2. Use LinkedIn to find out people who worked in the same companies you did or studied at the same schools and universities as you  and who are currently based in Switzerland.
Write them a personal message, explaining that you are about to relocate to Switzerland. Be open minded in the way you build your network: everybody might have a personal valuable experience to share about what life is like in Switzerland and they may know people they can introduce to you.

3. Propose to call them when you arrive to go for a coffee (it is common practice in Switzerland) and DO IT!

4. Network with your future local community on forums: Talk to people who will be able to meet you and to help you get started with building a local social life once you will be settled. A great networking place is internations.org. If you are a parent of young kids, join community like bebe.ch, it’s amazing the amount of help/tips you will receive from other parents on such forums.

5. Take time off: leave the moving boxes unpacked for a few hours, and join networking events, go and meet people you have contacted before you moved, visit your new city, treat yourself to a few hours of being a tourist in your new region.

Of course, if you are already in Switzerland, it’s not to late to build a network , the tips still apply.

Job4u2 is giving networking a predominant place in the 4U2 programs. We support the partners in establishing a local professional network in relation with their professional goals.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you want to know more about the 4U2 programs method and content and please share this blog with your NETWORK!

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.

 

You’ve accepted a new job in Switzerland: 4 tips on how you can help your spouse or partner feel good with the situation

This is an exciting time in your professional life: new job, new country, maybe even new company.

There are millions of things to think about.

Closing files in your current job, organizing with the moving company, setting practical details with the new one, planning visits for a new apartment, booking with the relocation manager, visiting the schools for the kids, resigning the contract for electricity, phone, insurance, for things you even had forgotten you had subscribed to, maybe even selling the house or finding a tenant, meeting new colleagues, new business partners, learning a new way of working, sometime traveling a lot…
This is without telling about the hundreds of other things you constantly have in mind.

In this overwhelming process, difficult to keep in mind that your partner is experiencing all the same but, and that’s where there’s big difference, without the excitement of making something he or she wanted deeply come to life.

Of course, this has been a joint decision, you have not forced anybody to move to Switzerland, this was really a family decision: you have discussed it in long and large, together you have made lists, allocated scores to the set criteria, you might even have weight the options according to their importance for the family. The decision was a family decision based on a robust decision process.

You are all extremely happy about the relocation.

Great!!

Bear with me for one moment, I have a few questions for you:

  • In these circumstances, how do you think is it easy for your wife or your husband to share with you this bitter feeling dip down hidden inside?
  • Your partner is taking on him/her big part of the tasks related to the relocation. Does the fact he or she is fully supportive necessarily means that it’s not a big thing to grieve for him or her?
  • You are a bit stressed because of the new job, this is not the most agreeable feeling but how much do you think that the lack of professional stress is compensating for the loss of the professional identity of your partner?

Of course, you realize all this, you are even extremely grateful to your partner and you do what to help him or her as much as you can, this is exactly why you are reading this article.

Here are my tips:

Be open

I meet coahees who tell me that they feel their partners is having a hard time in the new job but do not open up to them, afraid as they are that it will be interpreted as “I regret I took the job and made us come here”. The partners I meet are often sad about this.
Be open about what you experience at work, about your difficulties, your challenges, your successes and your joy: You made the decision to come together, your partner is expecting it to be couple adventure, something he or she can share with you.
Just phrase things are they are: “You know, it feels strange: there’re all these things at work I would like to share with you and I witness myself, not daring to. Maybe I am afraid it will make you feel bad. How do you see that yourself?”

Acknowledge

For your partner, it’s important that you acknowledge the difficulty of his/her situation. Simply the fact to acknowledge allow a release of tension. By telling these simple words “You know I realize it is not easy for you and I am extremely grateful you decided we would come despite of the challenge and the hard time we would have to face, especially you. It’s not easy every day at work but I am still glad I am taking this career opportunity and I am really aware that you participated for a large part in having made it possible”.

When coming back home after work, acknowledge again: it’s really simple, just say: “I thought about you today and I was wondering how much you were missing you job/your former life”

These are really easy words to say and they make a huge difference.

Don’t come with solutions…

Not that offering solutions is bad by nature, but in this specific state of mind your partner is now, solutions tend to be perceived as a form of reprobation.
“He/she comes with solutions, as if it should be easy and that’s me making it difficult. He/she doesn’t realize that I feel down and lack the courage to take action…every day he/she’s sending me job offers, this makes me feel even worth”
These are words I hear in my office.
When asking “have you told him/her how it makes you feel?”, the answer is always “I can’t because he/she will take it personally and will feel bad of having pushed for moving here, I do not want that.”.

…but be subtitle

You can help, you can be a supportive shoulder but it’s something one does differently than coming with solutions
Instead of saying “you should network”, say: “Tomorrow I take you out, we go for a drink with the Internations group, I take care of finding a solution for the kids.

Instead of forwarding job ads with the mention “FYI”, print it and take it back home and say:
“I’ve been forwarded that job ad. There’re a few words that made me think about you like -experienced biologist- and -strong interpersonal skills- and then, I was wondering if that’s a role in which you could imagine yourself. Have you ever heard about this group?

Instead of saying “you should investigate career coaching”, say: “The spouse of one of my new colleague has contacted the company job4U2, they are specialized in dual career support. My colleague said that her husband was positively surprised. I wonder what this is about. Have you heard about such thing?”

Keeping these 4 tips in mind will help you help your partner, however do not feel bad if you do manage to ease his/her mind as much as you would like to. When facing a change, we all go through a roller coaster of emotions and there’s no way to stop the process, the only things you can do is:
1- take good care of yourself and manage your own roller coaster.
2- smoothen the roller coaster of your partner by remaining open and not running away from his/her reality.
The roller coasters will soon or latter slow down and offer new perspectives to both of you.

Sandrine van den Oudenhoven
job4U2

About the author:
sandrinepicture_contactSandrine van den Oudenhoven helps dual career couples to make their relocation in Switzerland a project for both. With the job4U2 programs, she is supporting the accompanying partners’ professional integration by sharing her knowledge of the Swiss economic network, of the recruiters’ expectations and custom, but also by deploying her ability to nurture individuals’ motivation and positive energy during this period of major changes.